Shaun Hume, Ewan Pendle and the White Wraith (2012)

*We’ve been given a free copy of this book by the author in exchange for an honest review*

Ewan Pendle and the White Wraith is a Harry Potter-esque story, a first book in a planned series, and an independent enterprise. This last part in itself is commendable, being an independent author is a truly difficult position these days, when so many books are being published by the publishing houses, big and small, that you can buy something almost everywhere – on gas stations, in grocery shops, post offices etc..

hume

The first thing I need to write about this book is that even after all those edits (on Goodreads site there are already 5 editions listed) it is still in dire need of a skilled editor. There are just so many grammar, stylistic and spelling mistakes that they detract from reading. It is difficult to get immersed in a world where on almost every page looms the threat of a word “presently” or a phrase “liquid black eyes”, or… let’s just say a fair number of other expressions beloved by the author. There’s also way too much description. The plot is well thought-through, but the incessant avalanche of description buries it so deep under that it’s difficult to get into it and to stay engaged. Yet, with the help of an experienced editor and some good, hard work on the author’s part, this could become quite an enjoyable read – quick, light and entertaining.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Robin Hobb, Assassin’s Fate (2017)

Assassins Fate

Assassin’s Fate is the final installment in the acclaimed Fitz and Fool Trilogy, and the grand finale for all three trilogies about the two protagonists: The Farseer Trilogy, The Tawny Man Trilogy and, indeed, The Fitz and Fool Trilogy. But more than that, it is quite possibly the crowning achievement and the ultimate conclusion to all Hobb’s writing pertaining to the world of Elderling Realms: Six, sorry, Seven Duchies, Rain Wilds, Kelsingra and beyond. Let’s stop here for a moment and count those: four trilogies – because there’s also Liveship Trilogy – and one tetralogy about Rainwilds, newly hatched dragons and their keepers. Altogether sixteen books, each easily over 500 pages long. A solid piece of one’s life spent on reading – let alone writing! It’s not surprising, then, that Fitz and Fool and Nighteyes had become important persons in my life 😉 and that I was heavily invested in reading the end of their story.

And, before I say anything else, I must say that it is a worthy conclusion. As always, it’s heart-breaking, riveting, harrowing and rewarding, enthralling, cathartic, horrible and beautiful in equal measures, tragic and poetic and sad – and yet, still immensely satisfying and incredibly powerful.

Continue reading

Angus Watson, Age of Iron (2014)

Age of Iron, book one in Angus Watson’s Iron Age trilogy. These books have been on my radar for some time and finally, when I found myself in possession of some spare Audible credits, I bought an audiobook version.

These books were quite visible, at least here in Poland, cool covers everywhere in local bookshops, translated same year original editions were published. I expected light reading, with lots of gore and not-too-sophisticated humour. Something in the vein of Conan maybe. Somehow, I missed that they were supposed to take place in historical pre-Roman Britain, only with a dash of magic added.

age-of-iron-trilogy

And lots of forging 😉 Although, personally, I would start with glory, and then, thanks to  fire-forged leadership, finish with legends, but maybe the order doesn’t matter…,

Continue reading

R. Scott Bakker, The Thousandfold Thought (2006)

Thousandfold_Thought

Long time, no see – vacation time is not inductive to writing, but gives lots of opportunities to read, even in the middle of an Internet-less wilderness :). I usually leave the thickest books for my vacation time, as only then I might be sure of reading them in full, and in reasonable time. For the summertime I also leave those books which I wouldn’t have read any other time – vacation makes me more bullshit-tolerant 😉

And that’s why one of my summer readings this year was the final installment in Bakker’s acclaimed trilogy The Prince of Nothing. I know, I have said before I won’t be reading The Thousandfold Thought anytime soon, too irritated with previous installments to care; while The Darkness That Comes Before was still readable, The Warrior Prophet was just awful. But I like to finish things, and that gutted carcass left on my metaphorical porch, to use the imagery borrowed from Bakker, begged to be cleaned up and buried for good.

Continue reading

A comic book for the little ones.

Raising small geeks is a lot of fun. For me – definitely, but my nieces also look quite happy about it. I do not always get it right, and showing Coraline to a three year old… hopefully won’t come out in therapy later in life a source of some major issues 😉 And Brave, after which she was afraid her mother would turn into a bear, was not actually my idea (and Madzia enjoyed both, it’s just that there were some after-effects)

spidey

Anyway, there are better and worse ideas. I keep them supplied with Ghibli movies and Marvel plushies and make sure there are plenty of books, carefully screened for artistic value and gender equality issues.  I read them age-appropriate manga, we play games and tell each other stories. There even is a very special book she can read me!

It’s a chance for me to revisit some of the childhood’s favourites and find some new and exciting books. And in this area I’m not handicapped by living in Poland. Our fantasy is mostly mediocre (with notable exceptions, but still…), our s/f tends to be politically too far to the right for my liking, but kiddie books – we have plenty of the highest quality stuff. There are even some internationally recognised names, take a look.

Continue reading

Stan Sakai, Usagi Yojimbo (1984-?)

Popular culture gives us many great samurai figures. There are probably almost as many live action samurai movies as westerns, and The Magnificent Seven Samurai duo of wonderful classics show us how close these genres could be.

But I want to introduce one of my favourite comic books, so no more about cinematic depictions (hmm, who would have won if guys on the left fired on the guys on the right :D?).

uy5

In a world of countless great mangas, my favourite graphic novel Japanese warrior is an anthropomorphic rabbit by Stan Sakai, who, though born in Kyoto, is undoubtedly an American artist. I’m not going to argue it’s the most accurate vision of the medieval Japan, from the stuff I’m familiar with the honour goes to Vagabond, probably, and Rurouni Kenshiin has some great moments – usually just before going for silliness and fanservice. And then there is Samurai Jack, a hero whose story recently concluded, after years of waiting.

But Miyamoto Usagi from Usagi Yojimbo, he is my favourite!

Continue reading

Ursula Le Guin, The Found and the Lost (2016)

The Found and the Lost

The Found and the Lost is a collection of novellas by Ursula Le Guin, the founding mother of fantasy and SF as we know today. It’s a perfect book for both die-hard fans and for those who have never had the pleasure of reading anything by Le Guin before. A doorstop of a book at 600 pages in my digital copy and 816 pages in hardcover, it contains 13 novellas written in the period between 1971 (Vaster Than Empires and More Slow) to 2002 (Paradises Lost). The collection is presented mostly in a chronological order, but another categorization rule readily comes to mind while reading as the novellas can be divided into three main groups: Earthsea, Hainish cycle and “other”.

Continue reading