Adrian Czajkowski, Spoils of War (2016)

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Spoils of War is a Shadows of the Apt companion book consisting of 12 short stories set in the world of the Apt and Inapt around the time of the Twelve Year War. Some of the stories, such as Ironclads, Spoils of War or The Dreams of Avaris have been previously made available to readers on Czajkowski’s blog, others, like The Shadows of Their Lamps or Brass Mantis, are entirely new. Most of the tales take place in Commonweal at the time of the Wasp invasion, but there are also entries from Myna, Helleron and Collegium, before or after that time. And though the stories are very diverse, touching on topics from ingenious technical inventions through mystical hidden treasures, confidence ploys to love and sacrifice, the theme spanning them all is war.

I won’t wax over Shadows of the Apt now, having said enough already here. Let me just one more time emphasize the sheer scope and originality of Czajkowski’s series. I am a devoted fan of the incredible world he created and the complex, living, breathing, and most of all real protagonists populating it. Finishing Seal of the Worm had been a curious experience for me; one of a deep reading satisfaction mixed with more than a tinge of regret. The enormous, extraordinary tale Czajkowski spun through ten hefty books was coming to an end. A very well written, thoroughly considered, well planned and deeply moving end, granted, but still. And so I won’t surprise anyone saying that Spoils of War is a very welcome – if somewhat short – trip back to the world of Apt. I have missed the crazy reality of Insect-kinden, where steampunk clashes with high fantasy in an alternate WWII setting ;).

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Jeff Salyards, Chains of the Heretic (2016)

The final book of trilogy I really enjoyed. It’s sad the story is concluded, but better to be left craving for more than finish a veery long series out of sheer tenacity, plagued by boredom and embarrassment. Fantasy should probably be written in trilogies or series of trilogies 😉

Spoiler alert! This book is very good 🙂

Four years since the publication of Bloodsounder’s Arc’s first instalment, Scourge of the Betrayer in 2012 we got a 509-page final story.

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(I like the matte dust jacket a lot, and it’s easier to photograph than glossy jackets of volumes one and two…)

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Glen Cook, The Silver Spike (1989)

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The final installment in Books of the South, not exactly a part of trilogy (although the chronological order is more or less maintained), but rather a spin-off from the Black Company series. Instead of Croaker and co. we get White Rose and Silent and Raven. And, of course, a certain silver spike, containing the soul of Dominator, conquered in the Barrowlands in the grand finale of The White Rose. There’s also a very peculiar severed head craving for a body, and a really nasty dog who doesn’t like toads :). But it all comes together thanks to a quartet of greedy and not very bright no-names from Oar, who get the brilliant idea of stealing the spike and selling it to the highest bidder. What could go wrong with such a crafty plan?

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Glen Cook, Dreams of Steel (1990)

Black_Company_SouthToday is the Men’s Day in Poland. I decided to celebrate it with a review of Dreams of Steel, the second installment in the second almost-trilogy in The Black Company series, Books of the South. Why? Besides the obvious and false stereotype that military fantasy is a distinctly male sub-genre? 😉 Here it comes: while the first installment, Shadow Games, was written from Croaker’s perspective, the second – for reasons obvious to anyone who’s read the first book and not readily revealable to everyone else 😉 – undergoes a forced change of the narrator. The role of the Black Company Annalist falls to the Lady.

What a wondrous turn of events! 🙂 The infamous Lady, the long-standing infatuation and love of Croaker, the mover and shaker of the whole Black Company universe, has been an immobile center of the whirlwind of events from the book one. Now we have a rare opportunity to see everything that happens through her own eyes. To see… actually, I won’t tell you what we really see, at least not yet. One fact remains clear, however: her perspective is similar enough for the hard-core fans not to feel too betrayed, and unique enough to lend the series a new, distinct flavor. A tip of the hat, or better a deep bow, to Glen Cook; it is a feat that’s difficult to pull off even in normal circumstances, and what happened in the Black Company universe is far from normal.

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Glen Cook, Shadow Games (1989)

Black_Company_SouthAfter a few reading trips in other literary directions (like the bio-zombie dystopia The Girl With All The Gifts, or the popular tribute to pop culture of the 80’s, Ready Player One, the review of which will appear here soon) I came back to the world of Glen Cook’s Black Company. I’ll be honest: I missed those guys, ruthless and hapless cutthroats that they are.

Shadow Games is the first installment in the second trilogy, The Books of the South. Well, that’s not entirely true, because the Silver Spike is a stand-alone novel, but these are little, rather obscure issues and probably not interesting to anyone but me… Anyway. After the events depicted in The White Rose, when the Black Company eventually defeated the Dominator, but for an enormous cost, now the proud mercenary unit is down to seven men. Among them the Lady, powerless after her name had been found and exposed. Croaker became the unwilling Captain, but maintained also his primary role as the Company’s Annalist. Now the Black Company marches South, toward Khatovar, their unit’s birthplace, to fulfill the promise of returning the Annals home.

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Happy New Year 2016!

2016 is coming… To start it in a good mood and escape from dreary Polish political reality, let’s see what the New Year will bring us :).

Ola: The silver screen looks Marvelous, with Deadpool coming to cinemas in February, Captain America: Civil War in May, X-Men: Apocalypse in May, and Doctor Strange in November.

Deadpool looks promising. I wouldn’t have given one grosz for Ryan Reynolds before (ill-fated Green Lantern!), but if the movie delivers what the trailer promised it can be a really decent movie. Irreverent, disgustingly funny and full of black humor, if they don’t botch the story, it can really be a pleasant surprise. Take a look at this trailer:

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Naomi Novik, In His Majesty’s Service (2009)

Patrick O’Brian with dragons, and it works like a charm”, Chicago Tribune apparently wrote about Novik’s Temeraire series. That’s certainly the plan. Sometimes it comes close. Sometimes – not really. Ladies and gentlemen – I give you In His Majesty’s Service, collected edition of books 1,2 & 3 of the famous “Hornblower on a dragon” series. Books based on idea so awesome, Peter Jackson wanted to film it.

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I’ve read the omnibus, but I’ll score each book individually, I judge them very differently.

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